Posts

Right-Sizing Without the Fear of Losing Space

Both millennials and baby boomers are starting to be drawn to a similar type of home, a smaller one. These smaller “right-sized” homes are attracting millennials to help keep the clutter out and less yard maintenance. Baby Boomers are also finding themselves moving into “right-sized” homes now that their children have grown and moved out. One problem that this second group is finding, however, is clearing the clutter that they have amassed over the years.

In a recent article from Realtor Magazine, they write that “idea of moving to a smaller space can scare people at first. Once they do, time and again, people used the word ‘liberated’ to describe their move to a smaller space, with homes requiring far less time and money to maintain.”

Continue reading…

5 Tips to Downsizing

Downsizing. It’s inevitable. At some point in all of our lives we are going to need to clear out the clutter and downsize our homes. But what exactly do you keep and what do you toss? It is a very difficult undertaking to take on. Cleaning a home full of clutter, furniture, memories, and photos can be exhausting (and intimidating) but it doesn’t need to be.

In a recent article from Daily Caring we learn five handy tips to help you downsize.

1. Pace yourself
Going through a lifetime of important memories isn’t something you can get done in a weekend or even a week. Be realistic and take the time to make thoughtful decisions.

Pick one box or collection of items and go through piece by piece without rushing. After you finish with that box, then start on another.

Continue reading…

How to Downsize

One of the hardest challenges many seniors face is downsizing. However, it can be something to look forward to. Some seniors enjoy the idea of moving to a smaller place with less maintenance and upkeep. If you are looking to downsize, or if it’s time to have a conversation with your loved one about downsizing, timing is everything.

The decision to downsize is only one part of the equation. Once you’ve made the decision or have had the talk with your loved one about moving to a smaller home, there are an abundance of decisions that need to be made. Here are a few steps to help guide you through this difficult process.

Step #1: Choosing a New Place to Call Home

SeniorLiving.org writes “For a number of reasons, the most important thing to address first when downsizing is to determine where the senior’s next home will be. Considerations must be addressed such as whether or not the senior has memory issues, mobility concerns, their level of caregiving needs, budget constraints, the location of their loved ones and the preference of the senior. Deciding where they will move allows them to figure out just how much downsizing will be necessary. Furthermore, it may help the senior begin to feel more comfortable about the move and be far less reluctant and remorseful about the situation.

Continue reading…

Aging at Home or Move to a Senior Living Facility?

One of the hardest decisions you’ll have to make when you get older is where you want to live. Where you live not only affects your wellness but your longevity as well. Taking the steps and having the conversation with your family ahead of time makes things so much easier for your family when it comes time to think about assisted living. Go into this difficult conversation with an informed choice about where you want to live as you start to age.

A recent article from Where You Live Matters gives us a few questions to consider when making this difficult decision.

Questions to consider before deciding to age in place:

  • Would you rather be alone most of the time, or do you want easily available access to companions and social activities? While aging in place can be a solitary experience, a retirement community minimizes solitude. Choose which you’ll be most comfortable with over the long term.

Continue reading…

Seniors with Pets are seeing Health Benefits

Research is showing that not only is dog man’s best friend, seniors who are pet owners are seeing an increase in health benefits. It’s not just dog’s that are beneficial either. Studies are showing that seniors can form especially meaningful bonds with just about any four-legged companions and are reaping many life-enhancing rewards.

A recent article from CapTel lists FIVE different benefits seniors are seeing when they own a pet. Continue reading to discover more about how your pet can help you live a healthier life.

1. Lowers blood pressure

Seniors with pets tend to have lower blood pressure than non-pet owners, which is a key component in reducing the risk of coronary heart disease. In fact, research suggests that simply touching or petting a dog can lower blood pressure rates.

Continue reading…

Meetings Continue For West Davis Active Adult Community

WDAAC greenwayA series of meetings is underway, offering Davis residents insight on an active adult community proposed for West Davis.
At Shasta Drive and West Covell Boulevard, the West Davis Active Adult Community is designed for current Davis residents. It features 325 small to medium single-story homes, and affordable senior apartments. About 80 percent of the homes would be restricted to residents 55 and older. Since the project is on the city’s periphery, it would go before Davis voters, likely in spring 2018, if approved by the City Council.
“This is the best location for a wide range of active adults and seniors,” developer Dave Taormino said at his April 12 presentation to neighbors at Chavez Elementary School. The first of an estimated 45 meetings started earlier this year in West Davis – closest to the site. They will continue, about two a month, progressing through Central, East and South Davis. Residents receive hand-delivered invitations and brochures when their neighborhood meeting is scheduled. For more information, call 530-231-5519.
The West Davis Active Adult Community would be across from University Retirement Community, and close to Sutter Davis Hospital and other medical offices. Other project amenities include a public health and wellness center, pool, 2.6 miles of walking paths, an ag buffer, restaurant with outside seating, and expansion site for University Retirement Community or similar medical facility.
Unlike Sun City projects or other senior housing developments, WDAAC is designed to draw residents from within Davis, which would free up larger homes for young families. The dropping birthrate in the Davis Joint Unified School District forced the district to open spots for some 650 transfer students from outside the area this year. To sustain its ADA revenue, the district increased the number of transfer students by more than 100 since 2013-14. Outsiders make up 7.6 percent of the student body for the 2016-17 school year.
With college students and senior populations increasing in Davis, young families are often priced out of the housing market. Meanwhile, many empty nesters in town have larger homes than they want, but few alternatives for smaller, single-story homes in Davis. About 5,000 homes – 25 percent of those in Davis – are owned by residents age 50 or order.
WDAAC is designed with that in mind. Plans are the result of community focus groups, and draw expertise from local business, health, university, housing and clean energy partners. “Our plan combines attractive Davis neighborhood elements with updated amenities for the needs of older Davis residents,” the WDAAC Planning Group said. “We are rearranging, reinterpreting and innovating a variety of features with sustainability and energy efficiency,” Members of the group include longtime Davis real estate broker Dave Taormino, president of Taormino and Associates; and David J. Thompson, co-principal of Neighborhood Partners.
Plans for the 74-acre site call for 505 housing units. Of those, 284 would be single-family detached homes, 41 would be single-family attached homes, and 150 would be affordable senior apartments. Another 30 are anticipated for University Retirement Community expansion or a similar use. Single-story homes include: 1,400-1,800-square-foot houses along the greenway; 1,100-1,350-square-foot bungalows; 900-1,200-square-foot cottages; plus, small builder lots to accommodate custom or special needs. Estimated sale prices for the pre-planned single-family homes range from the mid-$300,000s to $700,000, and could be available in 2020.
The mission of the West Davis Active Adult Community is “to elevate ‘age in place’ to ‘thrive in place,’ with a thoughtful neighborhood design, blending the inclusiveness of Davis with principles that enhance older adult lifestyle.” Visit its website at https://westdavisactive.com/.

Save