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The Demands on Telemedicine

The Coronavirus pandemic is pushing many technologies ahead, none is more evident than in the world of telemedicine. This article published by the Wall Street Journal addresses the rapidly changing industry and challenges they are facing.

“Before the outbreak, telemedicine struggled to take hold, in part because of government regulation and a lack of interest from patients and big companies. Now, companies like Teladoc Health Inc. and Doctor on Demand Inc. are racing to add doctors and bandwidth, while big tech firms like Microsoft Corp. add services.”

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The Advancements of Telemedicine

What has taken years, suddenly has evolved in a matter of weeks. Telemedicine has been a work in progress for almost a decade, however, due to Coronavirus, the government has loosened restrictions allowing for many medical practices to quickly adopt the practice. Everything from dermatology to family practice doctors are quickly taking their work online.

In a recent article from MedicineNet they speak with Ivy Lee, MD, from the University of California, San Francisco, who is past chair of the AAD telemedicine task force and current chair of the teledermatology committee at the American Telemedicine Association. Lee states: “As we’re all practicing social distancing, I think physicians and patients are rethinking how we can access healthcare without pursuing traditional face-to-face interactions.”

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Fighting Loneliness During Coronavirus

Studies have shown that loneliness as a senior can have the similar impacts of smoking 15 cigarettes a day. So, how can we ensure our health when social isolation has been mandated upon us? The Coronavirus pandemic has thrown the world as we know it to turn upside down. Many seniors who are typically active or social have been forced indoors with limited or no contact with friends or loved ones.  According to a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine, social isolation has been linked to a 50% increased risk of dementia, a 29% increased risk of heart disease, and a 32% increased risk of stroke.

A recent article from the New York Times asked the question: What can people do to minimize the risk of being lonely when cut off from direct human contact? Loneliness is the subjective feeling that you’re lacking the social connections you need — the feeling of closeness, trust and affection of genuine friends, loved ones and community.

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Pets Provide Seniors Numerous Health Benefits

There is no questioning the fact that pet ownership for seniors provides numerous health benefits. From increased activity to companionship, owning a pet if you are a senior will increase your quality of life. As friends and family move away throughout life, a pet will always be there providing their unconditional love.  Additionally, dogs and cats live in the NOW, never worrying about what tomorrow will bring, sometimes a scary thought for many seniors.

In a recent article from Aging Care they give tips on finding the right pet for you. “While the advantages of pet ownership are undeniable, there are some drawbacks and consequences to be aware of before going out to adopt a furry friend for an aging loved one. Dr. Donnenfeld encourages seniors and caregivers to work through the following questions before welcoming a pet into the family.”

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Yes, Cooking Can Boost Your Mood

Just in time for the holidays, scientists have discovered that, yes, cooking and baking can boost your mood. A little creativity in the kitchen every day can go a long way towards happiness and satisfaction in the bustle of daily life.

“The study, published in the Journal of Positive Psychology, suggests that people who frequently take a turn at small, creative projects report feeling more relaxed and happier in their everyday lives. The researchers followed 658 people for about two weeks and found that doing small, everyday things like cooking and baking made the group feel more enthusiastic about their pursuits the next day.”

“Baking can help boost one’s mood by providing small tasks to focus on in a manner similar to meditating. In order to put together a good meal, cooks have to be constantly in the moment, adding ingredients, adjusting the heat of the stove and tasting their food to make sure everything will come out alright—all of which can be helpful techniques in treating some forms of mental illness”, wrote Huma Qureshi for The Guardian in 2013.

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